Blog Post Two: In the Pitts of It—Critical Response to A View of the Woods” by Flannery O’Connor

“Let us be grateful to the mirror for revealing to us our appearance only.” – Samuel Butler   Pitts and Fortune serve as foils in this story, constantly at war with each other for the role of the ruling patriarch of the family. Caught between them in this war is Mary, who is Pitt’s daughter but resembles her grandfather in both countenance and spirit. Fortune makes her his only ally in the war against the Pitts. Both of them seek to control her but in different ways: Pitts takes an aggressive, authoritarian position over her, beating her in the woods … Continue reading Blog Post Two: In the Pitts of It—Critical Response to A View of the Woods” by Flannery O’Connor

What is in a Name: Critical Response to “The Name Negro” by W.E.B Dubois

by Alsha Brown Read the letter here: w-e-b-dubois-the-name-negro My initial response to “The Name Negro” was, at first, quite indignant.My comments on the document range from the calmer “I see your point…but htere is power in naming things” to the more aggressive, “I hate being called African American, and I’d never forgive someone for calling me Negro.” To properly read and respond to his writing, I needed to separate my mind from my person issues with this topic. See, ever since I became aware of the social divide between black and white, I have struggled with what to call myself. … Continue reading What is in a Name: Critical Response to “The Name Negro” by W.E.B Dubois

New Americana

Lyrics: Cigarettes and tiny liquor bottles, Just what you’d expect inside her new Balenciaga. Viral mess turned dreams into an empire. Self-made success now she rolls with Rockefellers. Survival of the richest, the city’s ours until the fall. They’re Monaco and Hamptons bound, but we don’t feel like outsiders at all. We are the new Americana (ah, ah, ah) High on legal marijuana (sky high) Raised on Biggie and Nirvana (ah, ah, ah) We are the new Americana (ah…) Young James Dean, some say he looks just like his father, But he could never love somebody’s daughter. Football team loved … Continue reading New Americana