Blog Post Two: In the Pitts of It—Critical Response to A View of the Woods” by Flannery O’Connor

“Let us be grateful to the mirror for revealing to us our appearance only.” – Samuel Butler   Pitts and Fortune serve as foils in this story, constantly at war with each other for the role of the ruling patriarch of the family. Caught between them in this war is Mary, who is Pitt’s daughter but resembles her grandfather in both countenance and spirit. Fortune makes her his only ally in the war against the Pitts. Both of them seek to control her but in different ways: Pitts takes an aggressive, authoritarian position over her, beating her in the woods … Continue reading Blog Post Two: In the Pitts of It—Critical Response to A View of the Woods” by Flannery O’Connor

Flannery O’Connor A View of the Woods

Flannery O’Connor A view of the Woods: Struggle for Power Flannery O’Connor’s short story A View of the Woods illuminates several themes that occur throughout the story.  I believe the major theme of the story is the desire for power.  A View of the Woods is told through the perspective of Mr. Fortune, viewed through his experience and thoughts on his surroundings. The story illustrates Fortunes necessity for power and self-preservation which can be seen in his actions towards Mary Fortune Pitts and Mr. Pitts. The first theme I noticed is the theme of power which can be seen in … Continue reading Flannery O’Connor A View of the Woods

The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and No, Thank You John

I don’t like of most of the poetry that came out of the Victorian Era. That isn’t some big generalization, after two British Literature classes and reading some in my free time, I know for a fact that most of it bores me. However, reading The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock reminded me of one of the few Victorian Era poems I do like, No, Thank You John by Christina Rosetti. The entire poem is an epic (and hilarious) rejection of a man that is polite and brutal all at once. When comparing the two poems No, Thank You … Continue reading The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock and No, Thank You John

The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock and the Shell-Shocked Soldier

T.S. Eliot’s poem, the Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock is part of the modernist movement that emerged in Britain and to some degree the United States following the era of World War I. The Great War had a considerable impact on the consciousness of young writers, many of who served during the war. In Europe there madness of war led to the realization of the medical diagnosis “shell-shock” associated with prolonged exposure to conflict and helped foster an interest in exploring psychology through writing technique. Eliot’s narrative style in the poem, thrusts the audience straight into the middle of … Continue reading The Love Song Of J. Alfred Prufrock and the Shell-Shocked Soldier

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” A Quick Feminist Critique

Prufrock’s laments his aging; “With a bald spot in the middle of my hair— / (They will say: “How his hair is growing thin!” (131). “I grow old . . . I grow old . . . / I shall wear the bottoms of my trowsers rolled.” And in white flannel trowsers (rolled, we may presume), he plans to “walk upon the beach.” He could lament being aged not by years, but by a life unrealized and crumbling; “drown[ing]” (135) and ending in fear (133). Perhaps Prufrock’s dysfunctional love letter is meant for his muses; those who fancy him a … Continue reading “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” A Quick Feminist Critique